Monday, June 19, 2017

my solution

This is what happens when you have several hundred miles of flapping, shredding tarp and rope beating on your fake leather recliner.


The more you touched the arms the worse it got.  It had gotten to the point if you sat down in the chair you had little flaky bits all over you.  So this is my solution, cover the arms.

I had a raggedy pair jeans that couldn't be rescued.  So I cut the inseams, center front and back seams out.  I did some fancy pinning, trimming and sewing.  And viol`a!  Arm covers that look like they are going to stay on and not slide around like the kind our mothers had on the arms of their sofas.

I haven't figured out what to do with the back of the recliner yet.  Right now a folded afghan covers it.

Next up, is to finish packing because I'm heading back to my sister's in Wichita probably for the summer and maybe part of the fall.  Or at least until the doctors can get her pain under control, so she can figure out what she wants to do.

Hope everybody is having a good day!

Judy

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

a fleece afghan

Sis decided she wanted to send me home with all the pieces of fabric she had laying around.  No good deed goes unpunished. 😇  What am I going to do with a big bag of fabric?  The cotton pieces got folded up and put in a dresser I store some of the fabric in.  I decided to make an afghan with the fleece and I will be taking it back with me to Wichita.  She needs another blankie! 😉
So I squared the pieces up, split the brown nubby looking piece in two (Yup, that dark brown piece in the back is the other half to the lighter brown piece.)  Then I built a back out of one of the big piece of cotton.  As I sewed the pieces of fleece together I attached them to the backing at the same time.  I cut the backing an extra two inches per side to bring the backing around for the binding.  I had helped my mother to do this with comforts she made out of oddball feed-sack quilt tops she had.  The squaring up the fabric is something my grandmother did to make, quick, wool comfort tops when my aunt and uncle moved into an unheated house with 5 little kids in the late fall.
As you can see I just folded the raw edges under and zigzag the edge closed.  The whole thing only took 4 or 5 hours to do, once I had figured out how I wanted to construct it.
What my sister was thinking when she bought this fabric I don't know, but she gets it back on the back of an afghan. 😉  I didn't think to put a label on this one.  It is done, so it is time to get back to the scrap project I'm working on.

I hope everyone is having a wonderful day!

Judy

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

10-minute quilt block quilt...finished

I posted about this quilting project back in November of 2012.  I finally finished it.  This is one of the projects I found and took with me to Sis's.  The top was complete and I had made a backing for it.  So I pinned a batting in it and put it in the bottom of my suitcase.
It is interesting to note that it is the post with the most hits on my blog.  Everyone is looking for fast to make quilt blocks. This block is Not fast or easy.  It is fiddly to make as an eight-inch sized block, to put it politely.  That post is here.
I do think it would make a great bow-tie block with the raised center square.  I also like how after washing, the edges of the center squares are wavy with the way I quilted them.

The quilting is my typical stitch-in-the-ditch, a diagonal through the center of the blocks while I pondered what to do with the center squares.  I didn't want the centers to loose the raised effect but I had to do some sort of quilting because the section was to big to leave unquilted.  Thus, quilting a presser-foot's width from the edge hoping to maintain the raised look for the center of the block.  I think I accomplished that.  I used a diamond for the outside borders.
The back is twelve-inch squares so the quilt is somewhat reversible.  I like the square-in-a-square look in the quilting on the back.
Well, the label is on and it is time to put this quilt to rest and move on to the next project.  I hope everyone is having a lovely day.

Judy

Monday, May 22, 2017

a baby quilt

While I was suppose to be working on another quilt for a wedding in October, Sister Suzy came home from practicum and said they were going to have a baby shower for one of the guys at the end of May.  A distraction! Yes!  So I went out on the web, looked around, did some thinking on subject and this quilt from Missouri Star Quilt Company looked like a good bet.  They called it the Simple Squares Quilt.
I thought the quilt would look perfect in a rainbow of colors.   The quilt measures 42" by 54" after washing.  I used a low-loft batting.  That's all that Micheal's carries here in Phoenix.  I need to check out some of the quilt shops, Jo-Ann's and Hobby Lobby to see if any one carries medium or high loft battings since I like them better.
The big block is 5-inch squares.  The little block is 2 1/2-inch squares and the white sashing strips are 2 1/2 by 5-inches.  Borders were 3-inches wide.

I used stitch-in-the-ditch for the quilting.  I had trouble figuring out what to use in the border.  I wanted diamonds or triangles but couldn't get the math to work.  Then I had the bright idea to use a rectangle and connect them.

I took the leftover fabric from cutting the 5-inch strips, cut them 2 1/2" wide and sewed them in a rainbow for the binding.  The next time I do a rainbow binding I will pick off the cut edges so that it will be easier to match up sewing the strips of bias together.  I had some places where the color changes didn't match up neatly.
I used the last of the blue seersucker for the backing.

Sister Suzy will be adding a book to go with it.  Will be fun to see what she chooses.  I am betting Tuesday by David Wiesner or The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith, both favorites from her childhood.

Well the label is on, so it is time to wrap this up and to wish that all of you have a great day.

Judy

Thursday, May 11, 2017

sis's chemo hats, last part

Sis's chemo hats, last part...for now, anyway. 😉  I found Luuk by Annis Jones while looking for hat patterns for Tiffany's girls.
I made it with small balls of yarn I found in Sis's tub of yarn.  I think it's all worsted-weight Red Heart Super Saver done on US 6 needles, 5 stitches per inch using magic loop on 40-inch cables.  I cast on 96 for a 19-inch hat.  This hat couldn't be simpler to put together, knit three rows; purl three rows.
Looks like and old-fashion soft serve ice cream cone!  There is sizing from preemie (13) to large adult (24).
Sis says it actually stayed put on her head and didn't try to work its way up.  So I may have finally found a pattern for our bowling ball heads that works!

The last hat I knit was another one I found while looking for Tiffany's girls.  I thought it was pretty and feminine.
LuAnn Chemo Hat by Beverly Forester was knitted with the leftover blue DK yarn I got for the Feather-n-Fan afghan.  Lion Brand's Baby Soft called Bluebell.  I cast on 120 stitches that were suggested in the notes and did the full 7 repeats to get it long enough (5 1/2 inches) before starting the decrease for the crown, using a US#5 and used 1x1 ribbing instead of the suggested ribbing.  I also did not knit through the back loop where it was suggested.
I still think I got a nice lace pattern even though the rib is not as bold.

Edit:  I forgot to mention these two patterns came from Ravelry.

Believe it or not I have been sewing since I got back to Phoenix.  I have started three quilts and have finished one.  That's on top of the three quilts tops I have finished, one partially quilted and two more kits for quilts I found in Mother's stash.

HA!  And knitters think they have start-itis!  Most quilters could teach a thing or two about start-itis to knitters because most quilters have multi-generational quilt projects lying about.

I hope everyone is having a good day!

Judy

Friday, April 28, 2017

sis's chemo hats part 2

Sis came home from the Oncologist with a new hat that was crocheted.  She said it was cool enough to wear all day.  So I sat down with paper-n-pen and counted stitches row by row so I could duplicate it.  Here's what I came up with:

Gauge was 3 double crochets per inch, row was 3/8 to 1/2-inch in depth.
Finished length 8 1/4-inches, finished diameter was 9-inches.

Chain: 3 to 5 join with sl st; chain up 2
Round 1: 11 Dc in Ch ring; sl st; ch up 2 (12 stitches total)
Rd 2: 2 Dc in every stitch of rd 1; sl st; ch up 2 (23 stitches total)
Rd 3: (2 dc, 1 dc) repeat 11 times; 2 dc in one stitch; sl st; ch up 2 (35 stitches total)
Rd 4: 1 Dc then (2 Dc, 1 dc, 1 dc) repeat 11 times; sl st; ch up 2 (47 stitches total)
Rd 5: (1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 2 dc) repeat 8 times; sl st; ch up 2 (56 stitches total)
Rd 6: dc in every stitch (56 stitches total)
Rds 7-18: repeat Rd 6

This hat appears to be done in worsted weight yarn.

Now I don't have to worry about losing my little piece of paper.  Yeah!  A good example of this pattern is Simple Chemo Hat by Mamta Motiyani on Ravelry.

Remember that feather-n-fan afghan I made?  Well, I had leftover DK yarn.  I decided to try and use as much as I could up.  Time for a gauge swatch!  4 stitches to the inch and about the same depth of row using a G hook.  Here's what I came up with for the DK yarn:

Chain 3 join with sl st; chain up 2
Round 1: 13 Dc in Ch ring; sl st; ch up 2 (14 stitches total)
Rd 2: 2 Dc in every stitch of rd 1; sl st; ch up 2 (28 stitches total)
Rd 3: (2 dc, 1 dc) repeat; sl st; ch up 2 (41 stitches total)
Rd 4: 1 Dc then (2 Dc, 1 dc, 1 dc) repeat; sl st; ch up 2 (56 stitches total)
Rd 5: (1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 2 dc) repeat 12 times; then 1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc, 1 dc; sl st; ch up 2 (66 stitches total) [In other hats I redistributed the 5 dc through out the round.]
Rd 6: dc in every stitch (66 stitches total)
Rds 7-18: repeat Rd 6

LOL Once again I don't have to worry about losing my little piece of paper.

In the first hat I replaced round 18 with a shell edge starting with a half-shell and ending with a half-shell and 15 complete shells in between.  I used a 6 dc shell in this border.


Clown Barf and White for this one.

The next one I replace the last 3 rows with a Cathedral edging, which is an 8 treble stitch shell with a ch 3 picot between stitch 4 and 5 of the shell.  It looked great until you put it on and then the shells stood straight out from your head. 😕  So my solution was to add a band that pulled the points back in.

This hat was done in Teal and White.  If I were to repeat this hat I think I would move the Cathedral edging up towards the middle on the hat, so I would finish with the teal instead of the white against the face.

The third hat was a hat I found on Ravelry called a Diamond-Edge Hat from Designs by KN.  It uses a Catherine's Wheel stitch pattern.  A comment in the project notes of one of the completed hats pointed me to a You-tube video on how to do the stitch pattern.   That hat disappeared (probably in Sis's desk at work) before I could get photos of it.  The hat is primarily White with the first round of Catherine's Wheel in Blue and then a second round of Catherine's Wheel in Clown Barf.

My messy kitchen is calling my name, so I hope everyone is having a great day.

Judy

Friday, April 21, 2017

sister-in-law's hats

While I was knitting Tiffany's family their hats, my brother and sister-in-law came to Wichita to visit Sis and I.  Sister-in-law asks about what I was knitting, so I explained it to her.  She then asked if I would knit her a couple of ponytail hats and I said, "Sure!"  I sent her to the store to get worsted weight yarn.  She came back bearing 4 skeins yarn for two hats.
With the first skein of variegated yarn I made the Waffle Hat by Gail Bable.  It was one of the patterns I found on Ravelry while looking for hats for Tiffany's bunch.  It was knitted on US#6.  I cast on 96 stitches.  The Waffle pattern would have looked way better in a solid or a more subtle variegated.  I moved the ponytail hole up to 3 1/2 inches from the bottom edge.  It seemed to fit better there.  I started the crown decrease at 5 1/2 inches cause none of us really like the slouch look.  I didn't keep the band off the yarn so I can't tell you what color way it was except it was some CraftSmart Value Yarn.

The second hat was the same hat pattern (Jogger's cap by Karen Steward Longest) I used for Sister Suzy's hat, moving the ponytail hole to 3 1/2 inches.
I used US#6 needles again with a cast-on of 96 stitches.  Began the crown at 5 1/2 inches dividing the crown into 8 sections of 12 stitches and decreasing every other row.  I used the CraftSmart Value yarn SIL purchased in Giverny for the variegated and some white Sis had.  This hat turned out much nicer.
Next up...more hats.  😀

I hope everyone is having a good day!

Judy